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Great Trees of Arizona

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Nominations for the current year will be reviewed by the Arizona Community Tree Council Board at the first board meeting of the following year. The Board of Directors will vote on the entries at the board meeting to decide which trees receive the "Great Tree" designation. Entries must be received by November 30th of the current year to be eligible for designation.

Do you know where one of the Great Trees of Arizona is? CLICK HERE to download the Great Trees Brochure and Nomination Form.

PAST GREAT TREES OF ARIZONA...

[ 2010 ]  [ 2009 ]  [ 2008 ]  [ 2005 ]  [ 2004 ]  [ 2003 ]  [ 2002 ]

2003

Emory Oak Tree Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi (pictured)
314 Tombstone Canyon, Bisbee
This is one of the few oaks (of this size) in Bisbee that was not cut down to fuel the copper smelter, to cook with and heat homes.

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
SE of Mt. Logan on Road #1044 & 1064 (Sawmill Road) in Arizona Strip. GPS coordinates are 36 21.99' N & 113 11/72' W.
Tree ring count indicates approximate age to be 300 years. Height: 100 feet, Canopy: 54 feet, Circumference: 13.2 feet.

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
Old Sawmill site near Mt. Logan in Arizona Strip. GPS coordinates are 36 21.70' N & 113 11.75' W.
Estimated to be 300 years old. Height: 106 feet, Canopy: 54 feet, Circumference: 14.5 ½ feet.

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
NW of Mt. Logan in Arizona Strip at the end of Road #1016. GPS coordinates are 36 21.81' N & 113 15.00' W. Estimated to be 300 years old. Height: 96 feet, Canopy: 59 feet, Circumference: 14.4 ¾ feet.

Ponderosa Pine Tree Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa (pictured)
West side of State Hwy 64 at MP 230. South entrance to the Grand Canyon. GPS coordinates: 35 53.40' N & 112 07.84' W.
This unique tree is quite visible and recognizable to visitors on St. 64 traveling to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. Its large and "limby" appearance makes it very distinctive and attractive. This tree is relatively young (110 years) and should grow significantly in years to come.

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
Mt. Logan/Mt. Trumbull in Arizona Strip near road junctions 1029 & 1044. GPS coordinates are 36 21.85' N & 114 10.01'W.
This tree is a typical representative of the large and old trees found in the Mt. Logan, Mt. Trumbull & Mt. Emma area of the Arizona Strip. Based on tree ring counts of other large trees in the immediate area, the age of the tree is estimated to be 320 -- 360 years old. Height: 104 feet, Canopy: 77 feet, Circumference: 16.55 feet.

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
Mt. Logan/Mt. Trumbull near road junctions 1029 & 1044 in Arizona Strip. GPS coordinates are 36 21.89' N & 113 09.99'W.
Tree ring count indicates approximate age to be 340 years.
Height: 118 feet, Canopy: 65 feet, Circumference:15.5 feet.

New Mexican Locust, Robinia neomexicana
Mt. Logan on Arizona Strip near Petty Knoll. GPS coordinates: 36 21.25'N & 113 12.14'W.
This tree is estimated to be 80 -100 years old based on inconclusive tree ring count. Height 33 feet with broken top, Canopy: 28 feet, Circumference: 5.1 feet

New Mexican Locust, Robinia neomexicana
Mt. Logan on Arizona Strip near Petty Knoll. GPS coordinates: 36 21.26' N & 113 12.15' W.
This tree is estimated to be 80 -- 100 years old based on inconclusive tree ring count. Height: 38 feet, Canopy: 26 feet, Circumference: 4.9 feet.

Pinyon Pine Tree Pinyon Pine, Pinus edulis (pictured)
South of the Grand Canyon and west of St. 64 at Moqui Lodge Cookout area. GPS coordinates are: 35 59.28' N and 112 07.55' W.

Alligator Juniper, Juniperus deppeana
NE of Williams, from Hwy 64 on Forest Service Road #'s 71 and 110 near Poquette Hill. GPS 35 17.47' N & 112 07.01' W.
This particular tree has had a difficult life during its 500+ years. Prior to WWII its branches were used as a frame for the small cabin in the photo. Since then other large branches have been cut off for fences, firewood, posts, etc. It is difficult to estimate its age, but a rough estimate of the tree rings on the cut stems was 400+.

Neem, Margosa, Azadirachta indica
Xeriscape Demonstration Garden at the Glendale Main Library, 5959 W. Brown, Glendale.
This tree is in the mahogany family. Height: 40 feet, Canopy: 30 feet, Circumference: multi-trunk 12 feet.

Chinese Lantern, Dichrostachys cinerea
Xeriscape Demonstration Garden at the Glendale Main Library, 5959 W. Brown, Glendale.
Height: 18 feet, Canopy: 20 feet, Circumference: Multi-trunk 3 feet each.

Italian Cypress Tree Italian Cypress, Cupressus sempervirens (pictured)
Fire Station # 1, 310 N. 5th St., Kingman.
The eleven trees were planted in memory of the eleven firefighters who were killed in the July 5, 1973 propane explosion.

Cedars of Lebanon, Cedrus libani
Arthur F. Black Historical Home, 707 Cerbat Ave., Kingman.
These trees were planted in 1925 by A. F. Black. One tree is male and one is female producing the exquisite "wooden rose."
Height: 100 feet, Canopy: 30 feet, Circumference: 9 to 10 feet.

Fremont Cottonwood, Populus fremontii
Mohave Park, Kingman.

Deodar Cedar, Cedrus deodara
2002 Louise Ave., Kingman.
Height: 55 feet, Canopy: 30 feet, Circumference: 3.5 feet.

Pecan Tree Pecan, Carya illinoinensis (pictured)
2810 W. Southern Ave., Phoenix.
Tree is believed to have been planted in the late 1930's to early 1940's.

Aleppo Pine, Pinus halepensis
5725 N. 20th Place, Phoenix.
This tree was planted by Neil E. Cook around 1928. Height: 90 feet,
Canopy: 360 feet, Circumference: 6 feet.

Jacaranda, Jacaranda mimosifolia
5725 N. 20th Place, Phoenix.
This tree was planted by Neil E. Cook around 1928. Height: 80 -90 feet,
Canopy: 300 feet, Circumference: multi-trunked.

Sycamore Tree Sycamore, Platanus sp. (pictured)
Solano School, 1526 W. Missouri, Phoenix.
This tree was planted in 1972 by the school principal, Mr. Oswald. It originally provided shade for the students waiting for the school bus. Fifteen years ago after a major remodeling of Solano School, it became the center of a wonderful shaded area on the Kindergarten playground. It serves as the focus of instruction for many math, science, and language arts lessons.

Mesquite (Nahuatl mizquitl), Prosopis velutina
Maricopa County Library District's North Central Regional Library,
17811 N. 32nd St., Phoenix.
Height: 25 feet, Canopy" 25 feet.

African Sumac, Rhus lancea
8618 N. 9th Ave., Phoenix.
Jim Frost planted three African sumacs in his front yard in 1956. They were the size of his thumb. There are approximately 40 -- 50 cables supporting the branches, which spread across the entire front of the property.

Mesquite Grove (Nahuatl mizquitl), Prosopis velutina
1129 W. Heatherbrae, Phoenix.
The grove of trees is along the old Hohokam Canal. They are believed to be 75 -- 100 years old.

Evergreen Elm, Ulmus parvifolia
5505 E. Calle Ventura, Phoenix

Olive Tree Olive, Olea europaea (pictured)
6041 N. 23rd Place., Phoenix.
Height: 70 feet, Canopy: 264 inches, Circumference: 7 feet, 2 inches.

Aleppo Pine, Pinus halepensis
4107 E. Edgemont, Phoenix
This tree was planted by Mr. and Mrs. Osborn. Old leather shoes were planted with it as fertilizer as was the custom of Mrs. Osborn's father and grandfather in Germany. Height: 90 - 100 feet, Canopy: 80 feet, Circumference: 17 feet.

Olive, Olea europaea
5439 E. Calle Camelia, Phoenix.

Fremont Cottonwood Tree Fremont Cottonwood, Populus fremontii var. fremontii (pictured)
San Pedro House, Hwy 90 at the San Pedro River, Sierra Vista.
Height: 70 feet, Canopy: 143 inches, Circumference: 381 inches.

Monk's Pepper Tree, Vitex agnus-castus
4702 N. 36th St., Phoenix.
Height: 20 -- 25 feet, Canopy: 30 -- 40 feet, Circumference: 60 -- 70 inches.

Arizona Sycamore, Platanus wrightii
5201 E. Weldon Ave.
Height: 50 feet +, Canopy: 60 feet, Circumference: 102 inches

Cork Oak, Quercus suber
3016 N. 49th St., Phoenix.
Height: 70 feet, Canopy: 684 inches, Circumference: 8 feet, 5 inches.

Ironwood Tree Ironwood, Olneya tesota (pictured)
Fountainhead Corporate Park, 2400 S. 55th St., Tempe.
Height: 25 feet, Canopy: 57 inches, Circumference: multi-trunk.

Olive, Olea europaea
1841 E. Berridge Lane, Phoenix.
This tree was featured in the movie "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure".
The phone book which "took them back in time" was under this tree.
Height: 60 feet, Canopy: 300 inches.

Blue Palo Verde, Parkinsonia florida
7220 E. Gainey Ranch Road, West Guard House.
Height: 38 -- 40 feet, Canopy: 68 feet; Circumference: three trunks, 46 inches, 65 inches, 58 inches. Base of the tree is 106 inches.

White Floss Silk Tree White Floss Silk, Chorisia insignis (pictured)
U of A Campus, South of Engineering Bldg., North of Old Main, Tucson.
The original planting date was not recorded, but Professor Emeritus Steve Fazio remembers this being large and healthy when he arrived on campus in 1940. The US Herbarium has a 1957 specimen that includes a pressed flower from the tree. It is the largest in Tucson and maybe the largest in Arizona. It is winter deciduous, but even as the leaves drop in late fall, the creamy lily-sized flowers remain through December or January if not damaged by frost. This tree is native to southern Brazil and Argentina.

Boojum, Fouquieria columnaris
Guest Ranch Lodge, 801 W. Miracle Mile, Tucson.
This tree is equal in height to the tallest Boojum in Krutch Garden
on the U of A campus.
Height: 33 feet, Canopy: 8.86 feet, Circumference: 16.84 inches.

Acacia Tree Fever Tree, Acacia xanthophloea (pictured)
U of A Campus, SW of Cochise Hall, western end of 4th St., Tucson.
Planted in the 1980's, the UA Fever tree is another example of an experiment that succeeded beyond all hopes. Seeds were provided by Warren Jones. This is the only one on campus and is the largest in Tucson and perhaps in Arizona.

African Sumac TreeAfrican Sumac, Rhus lancea (pictured
U of A Campus, between Maricopa and Gila Halls on the northern
edge of the historical district, Tucson
Former U of A President, Homer Shantz collected the seeds in South Africa in 1919. They were propagated in Chico, CA then installed on the Campus in 1928. This tree is the first one planted in Tucson.


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WHAT CAN HAPPEN TO ARIZONA'S GREAT TREES
IF WE DON'T REMAIN AWARE AND INFORMED...

 

 

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